Phil’s Picks for May – 9 Components of Social Leadership

Leaders who embody these traits are often the most widely-respected amongst their peers.

Our ‘Hubs’ are designed to magnify the quality of social leadership in an organisation; we build the platform with the leaders, curate lessons from their shared wisdom, and establish a community for fast and flexible problem-solving.

Over the past 8 years, we’ve seen multiple examples of stand-out social leaders sharing their techniques through our communities and having them become essential tools for others in the organisation.

We may even be sharing an example or two of these impressive leaders in the coming weeks.

Infographic created by Julian Stodd.

Click the Image for Full-Size

9 Components of Social Leadership

The Hospital CEO who went Undercover as a Porter

In her book How to Have a Good Day, psychologist Caroline Webb draws on behavioural science to improve our understanding of why we behave the way we do at work.

How to Have a Good Day (Book)

It helps redefine the very tired ‘personal productivity’ canon of business and self-help books, whose main insights after decades and hundreds of books seem to be:

1) Make lists (Dave Allen) and

2) Focus on only a few things and ignore everyone and everything that tries to push you off track (great for collaborative working, dontcha think?)

What Caroline Webb does is recognise that the people we work with are, guess what, people.

How you behave is key

Caroline Webb

Webb spreads the net of personal and team productivity to include not just WHAT you do but HOW YOU BEHAVE.

Of course checklists are useful, says Webb. But then gives us a psychologist’s insight into the little burst of ‘feel good’ chemicals you get when you tick a box, and how that’s addictive and you’ll tick till you’ve finished your list (sometimes) and go home thinking ‘job done’ under Dave Allen-type personal productivity thinking, which is completely self-centred and shallow (that’s me dissing Dave Allen, not Caroline Webb).

Webb introduces the need to inspire yourself and others with reasons, like the ‘personal why’. The neat little story is below as an excerpt. We at the Leadership Hub like this story as it illustrates an aspect of leadership we feel is vital and rarely practised: Leaders need to be where the business is actually done, as often as possible, not shut in their meetings in offices, a distant figure to the rest of the organisation.

(You can be everywhere virtually, by the way, with one of our digital leadership communities that make your top team ‘present’ in all corners of the business, regardless of geography, but that’s just a gratuitous plug).

Here’s the Story:

Hospital

“….I once heard a nice example of this kind of ‘personal why’ from a community hospital CEO.  David was new to his organisation and still not a familiar face to staff, so he decided to spend a day working under-cover as an anonymous orderly to get some insight into how it felt on the front lines of his organisation.  David busied himself ferrying patients from the emergency room to wards and from wards to operating theatres, learning a little more about his hospital with every step.

At one point, he came across a guy who was prodding a swinging door with a screwdriver.  David asked the handy man what he was doing.  The man looked up and said ‘I’m fixing the hinge so it opens more easily; it’s too stiff so when you’re pushing patients on gurneys through the doors, it gives them a nasty jolt – that’s not going to help them get better, is it?’

Of course, the handy man had been handed a task list for the day by his boss and he was steadily working through it. It could have been dull, a grind, but in his mind the goal was not just to fix the door, it was to reduce harm to patients. Making the connection to something he cared about encouraged him to treat the tasks more like his own, intrinsic goals, giving him more satisfaction and, all the evidence suggests, resulting in better performance too.”

I love the way the emerging behavioural sciences are re-defining productivity for leaders and managers. The further away we move from the self-serving ‘get the monkey off my back and onto someone else’s’, the closer we get to collaborative leadership that serves the organisation, its people and customers, rather than our own career and need to get things off our desks to appear productive and in control.

Because that isn’t leadership. That’s the illusion of control.

Phil’s Picks for March – Morrisons Marketing Director recommends my book

Mike MorrisonsHoban, Morrison’s Marketing Director, has just recommended my Seven Secrets of Inspired Leaders book, along with The First 90 Days. Mike says there are too many books out there and that these are the two books marketers should be reading.

Here’s the link >>

Glad to see that leaders are still finding the book useful, as it’s 12 years old now. The community behind that book – the Inspired Leaders Network – brought together leaders who were achieving extraordinary results, from Body Shop founder Anita Roddick to First Direct founding CEO Mike Harris.

That ‘share great and emerging practice’ principle is what underlies our online communities now. >>

Seven Secrets Book

If a book of collated learning from 12 years ago is still invaluable to these senior leaders, it’s just another reminder how powerful emergent peer-to-peer learning is.

Phil

 

How to build an online Leadership Community of Practice

In these short videos, leadership development expert Phil Dourado explains how to build a leadership community of practice.

How the Leadership Hub's current corporate platform works

One-minute Videos

These links take you to the Hub, where you can find the videos.

The problem with existing Leadership Development

What is a leadership community of practice?

How to set up a leadership community of practice

Learning in real-time from each other

Small bites of learning to prompt action

A behaviour-led community

Emergence: how the content is generated

We reversed the time-paradigm for learning

Security & Confidentiality

To ask about setting up your own leadership community of practice: phildourado@theleadershiphub.com

Phil’s Picks for February: Drive for Diversity, and ‘Dyad’ Leadership

1. We recently featured a guest post on the Leadership Hub from a leader we have admired for quite a while.

Dame Stephanie Shirley came to us offering an article for the site and introducing herself, but our team already knew of her since my colleague Zara had pointed us at her TED Talk. We really admire her drive for furthering diversity.

Dame Stephanie Shirley

Worldwide probably the biggest cultural difference between leaders is gender. This has the most profound implications. Because equality will only come when men share leadership equally with women.

I’m an entrepreneur who, back in 1962, started a computer software company of women, for women. Leaders – men and women alike – often start things. They also then invariably determine the criteria for leadership in their own organizations and beyond — and thus who will, and will not, lead in the future.

 Here’s that Hub link again.

2. An interesting approach gaining attention in healthcare: ‘dyad’ leadership

…brought to our attention by this article in Cardiovascular Business.

What is ‘Dyad’ Leadership?

Essentially a leadership partnership.

An administrative or nurse leader collaborates with a physician leader, with the goal to bring out the best in both and to cover what the other is missing. ‘Dyad’ supporters tout that it reduces leader burnout and improves cross-division communication.

Dyad Leadership

And it dispels the core myth of leadership that a single leader is at the top. That alone is promising.

Having written before about the power of co-leadership outside healthcare (here on phildourado.com), I’m interested in the improving results being shown in the US, and whether it’s transferable to the NHS and other countries.

See you in March!

– Phil